The Wrong Prayer

In 1 Samuel 17 we see the familiar story of David and Goliath.  It’s not really a ‘story’, but more of a historical accounting of the events.  Hidden in this story are two ways people can pray.

Long before David showed up on the scene Goliath had been showing himself and scaring the Israelite soldiers for 40 days.  Although I don’t know for sure I’m fairly certain there were a lot of prayers going up, many of which might have sounded something like this:

“Oh God, please remove this giant from us.”

“Oh God, please let the giant die.”

“Oh God, when will this giant stop threatening us?  Isn’t there something you can do?”

Which, by the way, is often how we pray when encountering a scary or uncertain person, thing, event, or circumstance.

When David shows up on the scene, things change.  And, though I don’t know exactly what David prayed that day, I feel it might have been something like this:

“Oh God, give me strength, skill, and courage to prevail over this giant.”

God could have easily have gotten rid of the giant Himself, but He chose to use a man.  God could easily get rid of your obstacle, your problem, your giant, too, but maybe He wants to use a man or woman instead.  Not just any man or woman, but one of faith, knowing what God can do.

David didn’t face the giant alone.  But, he knew that God had delivered him from the lion and bear, and he had faith God would deliver him from the giant, too.  But, not with words or thoughts.  Action would be required.  That action, coupled with faith, produced the desired result.

So, which way will we pray?

One Response to “The Wrong Prayer”

  1. Barbara L. McGuire Says:

    This was a short blog but a very POWERFUL one! What a great message. I’m afraid the average person prays the first way you stated when all along, we need to be praying the second way! This definitely makes one think…especially the next time we take something to the Lord in prayer! Thanks for the blessing this blog is!

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